Android

Creating Multilingual Apps with Andromo

By June 10, 2014 2 Comments

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At Andromo we’re very proud of how geographically diverse our users are. From the very start, Andromo has been supporting developers from hundreds of countries, and the apps that they create are being used all around the world. And although (like the Internet itself) the majority of those apps contain English content, the number of apps that target other languages and cultures has been steadily increasing.

We’re happy to announce that all of the built-in text in Andromo apps is now localized. Hooray! Yра! Yaşasın! 万岁

So, what does this mean?

polish chinese francais german-youtube

Any text that shows up as part of the Andromo user interface — such as text in buttons, menu commands, and error messages — will appear in the language that is being used on the device, if the translations for that language exist within Andromo.

So far Andromo has been translated into the following 23 languages:

Arabic
Chinese (Simplified)
Chinese (Traditional)
Dutch (Netherlands)
French
German
Hebrew
Hindi
Indonesian
Italian
Japanese
Korean
Norwegian
Polish
Portuguese (Brazil)
Portuguese (Portugal)
Russian
Spanish (Latin America)
Spanish (Spain)
Swedish
Thai
Turkish
Vietnamese

Note that this does not affect any of your own content that you show in Andromo; if you want to show different content tailored to each language you will still need to create separate apps for each language/region, or serve different content to your app (for example, if you are hosting the content online).

Ok, cool…how do I make my apps do this?

Just rebuild them. From now on, any apps that you build (or rebuild) in Andromo will include any translations that exist up to that point. The app will choose an appropriate language based on which language is selected on the device.

If you want to try it out, just change the language on your device, and then launch your app. For example, on the Nexus 5 you can do this from the device settings by choosing Language & input, then Language, and then selecting the language you want to try.

Note that this will change the language used across your device, which could make it difficult for you to navigate if you choose a language you don’t understand. I recommend leaving the Language & input settings open while you test your app, so that you can return directly to those settings using the Recent Apps list. This makes it easier to undo the change if you can’t actually read the settings any more.

Japanese Language & input screen

Just tap the first item to change the language if you can’t read the settings any more

 

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